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THE PLACE: The original Full Belly Deli in Truckee is beloved at Lake Tahoe, so when the deli came down-mountain in summer 2015 to fill Reno bellies, I planned an early visit.

Except I didn’t. And then I didn’t. And then I kept getting sidetracked by Los Potrillos, one of my favorite Mexican spots, which lies a few doors down from Full Belly in the same Mill Street center.

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FULL BELLY DELI

Address: 3064 Mill St.

Phone: 775-657-8448

Hours: 7 a.m. to 3 p.m. Monday through Friday; 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday

On the web:www.eatfullbellydeli.com

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But the other morning, with slushy rain making me feel 50 shades of gray, I just can’t face the quinoa-healthy-something I’m planning for lunch. I need comfort food. I need a full belly. I head to the deli.

THE LOOK: The restaurant occupies a storefront that once housed, among other things, Mr. Pickle’s Sandwich Shop and, after that, Crazy Pickle.

There are high and standard tables, a couple of flat-screens and Full Belly Deli merch on display in a corner. You order at the counter. The other morning, workers assemble sandwiches behind a heap of long Dutch crunch rolls.

THE MEAL: I arrive about 10 a.m., between breakfast and lunch (when Full Belly Deli can get busy), so I decide to order an item from each meal to go.

A breakfast sando goes all-in on pork (bacon, sausage or chorizo, Black Forest ham), with scrambled eggs and cheese finishing the filling. I choose focaccia from among nearly 20 breads (including three gluten-free).

A Cuban sandwich hits all the standard notes: roast pork, ham, Swiss, pickles and swipes of Dijon. A French-style hoagie roll comes closest to Cuban bread.

The sandwiches are bundled to go in waxed kitchen paper; they stay nice and warm on the 10-minute drive to my office.

It takes until the second half of the sandwich for the sando to reach its full cheesy, salty potential (the first half, to my taste, needs ketchup).

The Cuban, on the other hand, performs admirably out of the gate; I love the contrast in pork flavors interjected with jabs of mustard and pickle. The sandwich press stripes the bun with grill marks.

KUDOS: The focaccia and the French hoagie are exemplars of their styles, sandwiches are generously proportioned and the Cuban alone offers reason to return.

QUIBBLES: Not a quibble but a question: Many of the tables are built for larger parties, so how does seating proceed when things are busy? Do you have to sit next to people you don’t know?

RETURN TRIP?: See Cuban.

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